Bee Fly

This cute little honeybee sized guy is among the many species of Robber Flies, but this Bee Fly  Diptera: Bombyliidae is another family of flies.  When he is not on cameras, he can be found checking out the pollen of the flowers, and on the ground.  This species lays its eggs in soil and takes a year to complete the life cycle.  The larvae are parasitic on immature stages of other insects and therefore is considered beneficial.

Bee Fly visiting Oakridge; Photo by Donna Burrows, May 2013
Bee Fly visiting Oakridge; Photo by Donna Burrows, May 2013

Reviewing pictures we have taken, I found a shot of the bee fly building his burrow in the ground.   I did not realize until recently, what the identity of the insect was.

Found the bee fly burrow, May 2012
Found the bee fly burrow, May 2012

 

 

 

Changed in an Instant

New Hatched Monarch Butterfly; Photo by Donna Burrows, May 2013
Newly Hatched Monarch Butterfly; Photo by Donna Burrows, May 2013

“This male Monarch butterly emerged from his chrysalis this morning about 9 AM.  I caught his picture immediately after his first flight.  He is gorgeous!” – quote from Donna Burrows

Please be sure to leave plenty of host plants on your property for this beautiful creature.  One source of information to learn more about “hosting” the Monarch is www.texasbutterflyranch.com.   Thanks to Donna Burrows, ORWMA Habitat Chairperson, for the wonderful picture above.  Another good place to learn about the Monarch is www.monarchwatch.org.  Check it out and have fun!